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by STEFAN HEYNE

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The magic of emptiness:
To this day, German photography remains influenced by the New Objectivity of the Becher School and its protagonists, such as Andreas Gursky, Candida Höfer, Thomas Ruff, and Jörg Sasse. In an attempt to oppose the classic aspects of the photographic image—sharpness and recognizability—Stefan Heyne (*1965 in Brandenburg an der Havel) leaves the objects in his pictures in a state of uncertainty, resisting the usual observational parameters. Faint traces of things appear in the light, only to disappear again in the contiguous darkness. This publication features Heyne’s most recent works, to date the most radical abstractions in his oeuvre, which show photography in a manner commensurate with its etymology—as “painting with light,” liberated from the belief in the objective reproduction of reality as it is inscribed in the medium to this day, one that continues to adhere to Enlightenment concepts.

STEFAN HEYNE

Reduced to the max: Stefan Heyne and NewGermanAbstraction The photographs of Stefan Heyne (*1965) are emphatically nonrepresentational. The artist omits elements that generally define a photograph, forgoing the use any identifiable motif. Instead he creates abstract photographs that are honed to perfection by paring his imagery to a blurred play of light and shadows with no indication of form. In his most recent series of works Heyne even avoids the use of soft-focus as an artistic device and emphasizes, in contrast, the high-definition reproduction of perhaps one of the purest motifs of all: the cloudless sky photographed by the artist from the window of an airplane. The color spectra of pure light that are revealed in these images seem blurry and out of focus, but they are not. Heyne thus achieves the most radical degree of abstraction in his work to date. In his photographs the viewer is confronted with an endless depth of space and eternity.

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42x28edition of 30$1,500.00

57

The magic of emptiness:
To this day, German photography remains influenced by the New Objectivity of the Becher School and its protagonists, such as Andreas Gursky, Candida Höfer, Thomas Ruff, and Jörg Sasse. In an attempt to oppose the classic aspects of the photographic image—sharpness and recognizability—Stefan Heyne (*1965 in Brandenburg an der Havel) leaves the objects in his pictures in a state of uncertainty, resisting the usual observational parameters. Faint traces of things appear in the light, only to disappear again in the contiguous darkness. This publication features Heyne’s most recent works, to date the most radical abstractions in his oeuvre, which show photography in a manner commensurate with its etymology—as “painting with light,” liberated from the belief in the objective reproduction of reality as it is inscribed in the medium to this day, one that continues to adhere to Enlightenment concepts.

STEFAN HEYNE

Reduced to the max: Stefan Heyne and NewGermanAbstraction The photographs of Stefan Heyne (*1965) are emphatically nonrepresentational. The artist omits elements that generally define a photograph, forgoing the use any identifiable motif. Instead he creates abstract photographs that are honed to perfection by paring his imagery to a blurred play of light and shadows with no indication of form. In his most recent series of works Heyne even avoids the use of soft-focus as an artistic device and emphasizes, in contrast, the high-definition reproduction of perhaps one of the purest motifs of all: the cloudless sky photographed by the artist from the window of an airplane. The color spectra of pure light that are revealed in these images seem blurry and out of focus, but they are not. Heyne thus achieves the most radical degree of abstraction in his work to date. In his photographs the viewer is confronted with an endless depth of space and eternity.

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